Three for: Free Classroom and Library Printables

Free quality educational resources?  Sign me up!

Iowa Library Services

Library Posters Iowa Library Services offers this collection of library posters in pdf format.  Print to your heart’s content!

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Thanks for culling links for us, Educational Technology and Mobile Learning Blog!

Venspired Learning

Krissy Venosdale generously shares her creative classroom designs and posters through her blog and Flickr account.  Check them out!

Image attribution:  Skipping Schoolgirls outside Victoria Station, London by UGArdner http://www.flickr.com/photos/22834654@N04/2445244162

Three for: Awesome Ideas for Library Displays

Is there a support group for Librarians Who Lack “Display Panache”?  If so, I need to join.  Until I can find that support group, I rely on Pinterest, Flickr, and Google to provide me with ideas.

Pinterest

Flickr

Google Search

Now, finding time to create these awesome displays is another problem.  Fortunately this semester I have some talented and willing service learners to help!

Image attribution:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/vblibrary/4604389463/

Three for: Free Resources for You and Your Library

Free is always good!

  • The Libraries Agency offers free templates for posters, notices, announcements, and more.
  • Have Playaways or considering purchasing them?  Circulation Station provides both  Click & Ship and a Build & Print options.  Get free posters, stickers, info takeaways, and shelf tape through the Click & Ship option.  Customize posters, trifolds, and newslettters on the Build & Print page.
  • Love, love, love this downloadable pdf (see photo above) to display in your library!  Gale Cengage Learning offers this and more.  School librarians can find resources designed specifically for K-12 here.  Check out the Lesson Plan Library.

Free Educational Posters

Poster-Street offers an array of free posters that teachers and teacher librarians can download, print, and display. And with dwindling (or disappearing) budgets, free looks even better.

The posters are divided into several categories:

*office

*home

*teacher

*kids

*teens

Visit the site to discover posters that will inspire both you and your students.

(Screenshots of posters used here, but the site does provide embed codes.  WordPress.com does not allow me to use them, however.)

Banned Books Week

Be on the lookout for this dangerous rabblerouser

***Warning:  my tongue seems to be stuck in my cheek this evening.

Banned Books Week (Sept. 24 – Oct. 1, 2011) is just around the corner. When I tell my students that we will be celebrating “Banned Books Week,”  I often am greeted with incredulous looks.

I know what those looks mean:  “Why would you celebrate the fact that books are banned?”  I have to quickly explain that the celebration focuses on our right to read what we choose.

Close to Home

Two years in a row, citizens of South Carolina have made it their mission to provide me with examples of books challenged in my own state.  How absolutely thoughtful of them.

Last year, my BBW bulletin board featured the book Sold by Patricia McCormick.  Its inclusion in a middle  school library had been questioned in Laurens, South Carolina that summer by a “well meaning” parent.

The parent chose not to  pursue the formal challenge process, but by going to the news media, she surely convinced many South Carolina middle schoolers NOT to read the book.  After all, teens never question adults’ intelligence.

This summer, a concerned parent challenged Chris Crutcher’s Angry Management.  He was horrified that a book that contained so much profanity in its first 24 pages would be on a summer reading list.  (He took the time to count the words?)

So tonight as I consider activities and displays to celebrate our right to read, I thought I’d have a bit of fun.  Dangerous authors are running amuck in the world.  What’s a librarian to do?

Well, librarians do value copyright, so this one asked for permission to use Chris Crutcher’s photo in the “Wanted” poster.  Visit his website to view the original photo and to also download “Guide to Teaching Challenged and Banned Books featuring the novels of Chris Crutcher.”

Want to make your own “Wanted” posters?  Visit this site.

One last thing – definitely not tongue-in-cheek:  I love my home state and am proud to be a Southern girl.  The two parents who challenged books are not representative of the entire state.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,163 other followers